Depression and Bipolar info explaining the latest research in everyday English

4Jan/11Off

When to suspect bipolar disorder

The Journal of Family Practice has a useful practitioner’s guide to identifying when a patient may be presenting with bipolar disorder symptoms.

As the authors say, bipolar disease is often misdiagnosed, sometimes repeatedly.

The authors—Muruga Loganathan, MD, Kavita Lohano, MD, R. Jeanie Roberts, MD, Yonglin Gao, MD, and Rif S. El-Mallakh, MD—report that close to one-third of patients with bipolar disorder seek medical care within a year of the onset of symptoms, but nearly 70% do not receive an accurate diagnosis until they’ve seen four physicians.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) defines 4 types of bipolar illness: bipolar I, bipolar II, cyclothymia (the most mild form), and not otherwise specified The key feature of all 4 types—and the distinguishing characteristic that diagnosis typically hinges on—is a manic or hypomanic episode.

Although a full-blown manic episode may not be hard to identify, hypomania is easily missed. By definition, hypomania—with its heightened sense of well-being and productivity—is not problematic and is rarely a patient’s primary complaint.

Mixed mania, a feature of bipolar I, is the worst of both worlds: It is a state in which a full manic episode is superimposed on a full depressive episode—a depression with all the energy and force of a mania. Patients who have experienced one episode of mixed mania have a 12-fold increase in mixed states, 6.5 times more depression, and 1.7 times more dysthymia than those who experience manic episodes without the overlay of depression.

I and countless others can attest as to how horrible it is.

The authors recommend using the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) constructed by Hirschfeld et al. as a useful guide to bipolar disorder identification. There’s a copy of the MDQ in the JFP’s article, as well as the original source article.

If you or someone you know is wondering if they might have bipolar disorder (and one psychiatrist I know of is convinced that all ‘depressive’ patients have an element of mania within their history and should therefore be considered in a new, bipolar, light) then ask their GP to administer the MDQ, or refer them to someone who can.

It could be the help they need to get them on the path to managing their illness appropriately.

Sources:

Hirschfeld RM, Williams JB, Spitzer RL, et al. Development and validation of a screening instrument for bipolar spectrum disorder: the Mood Disorder Questionnaire. Am J Psychiatry.
2000;157:1873-1875.

Loganathan, Muruga; Lohano, Kavita; Roberts, R. Jeanie; Yonglin Gao; El-Mallakh, Rif S.  When to suspect bipolar disorder. Journal of Family Practice, Dec2010, Vol. 59 Issue 12, p682-688, 7p


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