Depression and Bipolar info explaining the latest research in everyday English

4Aug/09Off

Do SSRIs erode your bones?

There's a growing body of evidence that SSRIs are eroding bones, resulting in increased risks of osteoporosis and fractures.

The Harvard Mental Health Letter for August 2009 reports on a ten-year history of research that noticed a disturbing correlation (a seeming relationship between two sets of data): depressed patients had lower bone strength and a greater risk of fractures.

Although the earlier studies left the door open to a pharmaceutical reason for increased risk of fracture (as in, the medications used may have caused dizziness, resulting in falls and fractured bones), later studies have been better-designed and seem to implicate SSRIs are causing bone erosion.

Two recent significant studies appear to conflict. One finds that inhibiting 5-HTT, which SSRIs do better than any other antidepressants, slows bone formation and accelerates bone resorption (which is when calcium and other minerals are released into the bloodstream, leaving trenches behind in the bones); the other finds that inhibiting 5-HTT actually increases bone mass.

5-HTT is the transporter mechanism for 5-HT, which you might know as serotonin; SSRIs enhance serotonin activity.

Despite the conflict between the two aforementioned studies, the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study Research Group followed 5,008 men and women who were aged 50 and over for five years, finding that the patients who were taking SSRIs everyday had lowered bone mineral density measurements, particularly in the hip. They were also twice as likely as non-SSRI-taking patients to suffer a bone fracture.

Ways to overcome any risk of bone erosion include increasing the intake of calcium, increasing the intake of vitamin D, reducing the amount of caffeine and alcohol taken, and exercising in a way that bears weight on bones (such as walking, weight lifting, stair climbing). It also seems that some medications help slow bone resorption: alendronate (Fosamax), risedronate (Actonel) and ibandronate (Boniva) are mentioned positively.

Of equal significance is that no one has yet taken a look at how SSRIs might affect the bones of children or teenagers.

Source: Harvard Mental Health Letter, August 2009 - www.health.harvard.edu.


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27Jun/09Off

Antidepressants and suicide

Here’s a statement of the bleedin’ obvious: ‘depression increases the risk of suicide.’

But the research community is divided as to whether one of the extremely unwanted side-effects of second-generation antidepressants is an actual increase the likelihood of suicide, especially in the initial phases of medication, or not.

   

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